Previous bacterial infection increases risk of newly-diagnosed Sjögren's syndrome

The results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR) 2017 have shown a link between newly-diagnosed Sjögren's syndrome (SjS) and previous infection with nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM).
However, even though an increased risk of tuberculosis (TB) has been found in patients with SjS, in this study, TB infection itself did not appear to be associated with an increased risk of going on to develop SjS.
Patients newly diagnosed with primary SjS (in people with no other rheumatic disease) were around 11 times more likely to have had a prior infection with NTM than a matched group of controls. The magnitude of the association between NTM and SjS risk was greatest among those patients aged between 45 and 65 years. No association was found between SjS and a previous TB infection.
SjS is an immune mediated chronic inflammatory disease where the body's immune system attacks glands that secrete fluid, such as the tear and saliva glands. Inflammation within the glands reduces fluid production causing painful burning in the eyes, dry mouth, and sometimes dryness in the nasal passages, throat, vagina and skin.
Source : www.sciencedaily.com      2017/7/17 10:43

خانه چاپ ارسال به دوستان نسخه متنی کوچک کردن متن بزرگ کردن متن دانلود خروجی پی دی اف خروجی میکروسافت ورد
0/10 (تعداد آرا 0 نفر )
Copyright © 2011 AASM. All Rights Reserved.